P&S Nissan Leaf Control Board Pinout

I have seen a lot of questions about how to wire up Paul’s control board for the Nissan Leaf inverter. Please refer to the table below with my notes. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment.

Control Board Connectors

2013-2017 Nissan Leaf Control Board Ver. 1.2 pinout

Pin 1 is marked with a white dot on the board.

J5 Pin Connected to Notes
1
CAN HighCAN BUS is not yet implemented, so don’t worry about this.
2CAN Low
CAN BUS is not yet implemented, so don’t worry about this.
3GroundYou can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
4Ground
You can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
5USB Data –This connection is for the USB interface. It is used to change software parameters after the microprocessor has already been programmed. You cannot reprogram the microprocessor through this interface. This wire is usually white in a standard USB cable.
6USB Data +
This connection is for the USB interface. It is used to change software parameters after the microprocessor has already been programmed. You cannot reprogram the microprocessor through this interface. This wire is usually green in a standard USB cable.
7USB VCC

This connection is for the USB interface. It is used to change software parameters after the microprocessor has already been programmed. You cannot reprogram the microprocessor through this interface. This wire is usually red in a standard USB cable.
8Ground
You can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
9Ground
You can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
10Throttle SignalThis is the 0-5v output from through throttle position sensor or throttle potentiometer.
11+5vThis pin is used for the +5v input for your throttle.
12Ground
You can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
13Ground
You can use this ground for the USB interface, Throttle, etc.
14Fordward/Reverse 1Pins 14 and 15 may be connected to a switch. When the switch is closed, the motor will spin in one direction. When it is open, the motor will spin in the opposite direction. The initial direction is specified as a parameter in the software.
15Forward/Reverse 2
Pins 14 and 15 may be connected to a switch. When the switch is closed, the motor will spin in one direction. When it is open, the motor will spin in the opposite direction. The initial direction is specified as a parameter in the software.
J6 Pin Connected toNotes
1External Temperature 1This pin is for reading a thermistor for temperature sensing. It is currently unused, so don’t worry about it.
2
External Temperature 2

This pin is for reading a thermistor for temperature sensing. It is currently unused, so don’t worry about it.
3Analog Brake SignalThis pin is used for a brake transducer. This links the regenerative braking level to the pressure in the brake system as you press the brake pedal. It is not currently used, but it could be. Regen is currently controlled through the throttle pedal.
4Ground
You can use this ground for Motor Temperature Pin 2.
5+5vCurrently unused.
6Ground
You can use this ground for Motor Temperature Pin 2.
7Ground
You can use this ground for Motor Temperature Pin 2.
8Resolver Excite –Also known as “Resolver !Excite”. See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
9Resolver Excite +
Also known as “Resolver Excite”. See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
10Motor Temperature Pin 1Currently unused in the software, but will be implemented later. The motor thermistor pin is on the resolver connector.
11Resolver SIN +
See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
12Resolver SIN –
See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
13Resolver COS –
See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
14Resolver COS +
See the graphic below for the resolver pinout.
15Ground
You can use this ground for Motor Temperature Pin 2.
J1-4 Connects toNotes
J1Precharge Coil +If you are using the control board for precharge control, you will connect the +12v for the precharge contactor to J1. Connect the other coil wire to 12v auxiliary ground.
J2
Contactor coil +

If you are using the control board for precharge control, you will connect the +12v for the main contactor to J1.
Connect the other coil wire to 12v auxiliary ground.
J3Auxiliary GroundThis ground is not the same as what is used on J5 and J6. This ground connects to the auxiliary 12v system.
J4+12vThis powers the control board and the contactors. Connect this to the +12 auxiliary.

The Resolver Connector

This one is easy. Just use the original connector that came with the motor. Cut the end off, leaving plenty of wire to work with, and connect the pins as labelled here. You will notice 2 TEMP pins. Connect Motor Temperature Pin 1 to TEMP1. !EX is Excite -, and EX is Excite +.

16 thoughts on “P&S Nissan Leaf Control Board Pinout”

  1. Oh my gosh you are literally sent from heaven above. Thank you for all your help. You have a real knack for explaining things. I think I confuse people with crappy wording.

  2. Thanks for listing this. Why is J5 Pin 1-15 listed twice? Is that a mistake? Also, What connections actually control the inverter? Can L and H are listed as not implemented and I don’t see anything else that connects to the inverter. I don’t have my control board yet, so maybe it will be an obvious connector, but I thought I would ask to be sure. All of your posts are great. The cad drawing for the adapter plate is perfect.

    1. Typo šŸ™‚ Fixed. If I end up needing another plate, I will rotate the center holes a bit and add a locating ring. Keep that in mind, as it’s not tested in the car, yet. Looks pretty good, though, and lines up well!

  3. Thanks again for your posts. They really are a big help. I am converting an old mustang using the leaf motor and P&S controller board. I am curious if you considered using the precharge control and if you know how it works on this board. Is it just a timer based control? So many seconds of precharge and then the main contactor is switched on and precharge contactor is switched off. Any other insights you can share would be awesome. I was also considering using the precharge circuit in the leaf or the Zeva Smart Precharger.

    1. You’re welcome! I used the precharge control during testing, but the BMS that I am using manages the precharge. The precharge system on Paul’s board is timer based. I believe the default precharge time is 3000ms. It’s sufficient, but you have to wire it up a little strangely to get it to run a positive and negative contactor in tandem with the precharge contactor. It would have to close the negative contactor and the precharge at the same time, then the negative and positive after precharge is completed. I’m sure it would work fine, but the functionality to support both more easily is built into my BMS. The one in my BMS will also read the voltage and make sure it’s actually precharging before it closes the contactors, which is another level of safety. The ZEVA BMS in the MG does the same thing.

      Paul’s board will close the precharge contactor for the time you set, then it will close the main contactor, then it will open the precharge contactor. One wire from the battery pack is assumed to be connected, while the other goes through a contactor.

      Any of these would work well, in all honesty.

      1. Jeff, why would you have to only close the negative contactor and the precharge relay THEN close the positive contactor? I am using the Leaf precharge as is, and Paul says to just wire the two main contactors so they close at the same time. He says he has not done this as he has just used one main contactor in his testing.

        1. Another thing. There are 2 pins for forward/reverse. As you say that ON = a settable direction and OFF is the opposite direction, should I only need to use one of these pins and a ground?

          1. A switch is connected to both of the pins. When the pins are joined, it’s one direction, and it’s the opposite direction when they’re disconnected.

        2. If you do not close the negative contactor, the precharge contactor will not be able to actually close the circuit. You will have the negative disconnected and the positive on precharge. If you’re using just one contactor, it doesn’t matter. If you have two contactors, one on each side of the battery, and one precharge contactor, you must close the precharge contactor and the contactor on the opposite side to complete the circuit.

  4. Thanks so much for all this information about the Leaf motor. With so many out there now it seems like they are a great motor to build a project around. In regards to the P&S board: Are you just wiring the board straight into the inverter in place of the Nissan board? I know Paul does in depth about building a three-phase controller and you followed that for your DC build, but I would assume that most of that hardware is already in Nissan’s inverter and you’re just wiring in the board. Correct me if I’m wrong. Thanks for taking us along on this journey. It’s really cool to watch it develop.

    Are you planning to use the field weakening as simulating an electric second gear for highway speeds? It looks like you’re planning to leave it in second gear with a welded coupler so, again, I’m making that assumption; but it seems like it would make sense. Do you know what the maximum RPM limit on this particular motor is? Thanks again.

    1. The connectors from the original brain board in the inverter need to be removed from it and attached to Paul’s board. From there the original wires plug straight into the board. This is much, much easier than building the DC controller šŸ™‚

      I am planning on leaving the transmission in second gear and using field weakening to increase the top speed. We will have to see how the transmission handles it. I can add a shift lever easily enough if it becomes an issue! I’ve heard that someone took the motor up to 15,000 RPM, but I do not know what the limit is. I think in the stock leaf they take it up to about 11,500 RPM.

  5. Oh! I forgot my other question. Can the Nissan compressor for the AC be controlled as well? I imagine you haven’t even put any thought into that, yet; but I thought I might ask.

    1. I haven’t looked at that, actually. There are some high voltage AC compressors that work with just power and an enable line. I’m trying to sort that out, actually. I’ll add a post about it when I find one.

  6. This is what I got from Paul when ordering my board…

    2011-2012 Nissan Leaf Control Board Ver. 1.2 pinout

    CN2 (The big white connector):
    Pin 1: !EXCITE
    Pin 2: UNUSED
    PIN 3: EXCITE
    PIN 4: UNUSED
    PIN 5: SIN+
    PIN 6: UNUSED
    PIN 7: SIN-
    PIN 8: UNUSED
    PIN 9: COS-
    PIN 10: UNUSED
    PIN 11: COS+
    PIN 12: UNUSED
    PIN 13: UNUSED
    PIN 14: ground from control board (can be used for 2nd wire of temperature)
    PIN 15: temperature pin 1
    PIN 16: unused
    PIN 17: Ground for 12v input power
    PIN 18: unused
    PIN 19: Ground for 12v input power
    PIN 20: Ground for 12v input power
    PIN 21: USB VCC (the red wire in a USB cable)
    PIN 22: unused
    PIN 23: USB DATA+ (the green wire in a USB cable)
    PIN 24: USB DATA- (the white wire in a USB cable)
    PIN 25: unused
    PIN 26: forward/reverse pin #1
    PIN 27: 0-5v analog brake input
    PIN 28: unused
    PIN 29: 0-5v analog throttle
    PIN 30: +5v from control board (for powering analog throttle, analog brake)
    PIN 31: unused
    PIN 32: CAN LOW
    PIN 33: unused
    PIN 34: CAN HIGH
    PIN 35: precharge out + (this powers the positive coil of the precharge relay)
    PIN 36: CONTACTOR out + (this powers the positive coil of the main contactor)
    PIN 37: CONTACTOR out + (this powers the positive coil of the main contactor)
    PIN 38: +12v input power
    PIN 39: unused
    PIN 40: +12v input power

How about that, eh? What do you think?